Huge asteroid the size of a LONDON bus will fly within 2,100 miles of Earth this week

Author: Nishu January 24, 2023


An asteroid the size of a London bus will make the fourth closest approach to Earth on record this week.

The space rock, known as 2023 BU, was only discovered by NASA last weekend but is set to come within 2,100 miles (3,400 km) of our planet’s surface this Friday (January 27) at about 00:30 GMT (19:30 ET on Thursday).

Most asteroids pass beyond the distance of the moon – which is 240,000 miles away – but this one is far closer and will be the closest for 300 years.

The object is about half the size of the famous Chelyabinsk meteor that hit Earth in 2013.

Don’t look up! An asteroid the size of a London bus, known as 2023 BU, will make the fourth closest approach to Earth on record this week (stock image)

Comparison: The space rock measures about 12.4 by 27.8 feet, which is around the same size as the original Routemaster London bus.

What is a ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid?

A potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) is an asteroid whose orbit comes closer than 0.05AU (about 7.5 million km) to the Earth.

It is also at least 100 meters (300 feet) in diameter.

The International Astronomical Union claims there are around 1,500 potentially hazardous asteroids.

Although these are not a risk to Earth as of yet, asteroids this large have the potential to cause devastation if they were to land on our planet, especially in highly-populated areas.

It is believed that one hits Earth once every 200-300 years.

The asteroid is due to make the fourth closest pass of more than 35,000 past and future Earth approaches, according to NASA’s Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), which holds data covering the period from 1900 to 2200.

A live stream, hosted by the Virtual Telescope Project (VTP) in Italy, will be made available for people to witness the event from 19:15 GMT (14:15 ET) on Thursday.

This will be the only way to see the asteroid – 2023 BU is so small that it will shine at a maximum of 11.3 magnitude, which is too faint to be seen with the naked eye.

Instead, it has to be picked up by large, powerful telescopes, such as the VTP’s 14-inch and 17-inch robotic ones at Ceccano.

The space rock will race past Earth at 33,000 mph at a distance of 6,500 miles (10,500 km) from the center of our planet and 2,100 miles (3,400 km) from the surface.

It measures about 12.4 by 27.8 feet, which is around the same size as the original Routemaster London bus.

Even though it was only spotted five days ago, experts have calculated its orbit and insist there is no chance of 2023 BU hitting Earth on this particular approach.

However, even if it did there is a good chance it wouldn’t reach the surface.

Space rocks that are smaller than 82 feet (25 meters) across most likely burn up if they enter the Earth’s atmosphere, NASA says, causing little to no damage on the ground.

Although it won’t impact us, by some definitions the asteroid will technically pass through the uppermost region of our planet’s atmosphere, which is known as the ‘exosphere’.

This is said to extend from around 6,000 miles (10,000 km) up to a maximum distance of 120,000 miles (193,000 km) above Earth.

Even though it was only spotted five days ago, experts have calculated its orbit (pictured) and insist there is no chance of 2023 BU hitting Earth on this particular approach.

A live stream, hosted by the Virtual Telescope Project (VTP) in Italy, will be made available for people to witness the event from 19:15 GMT (14:15 ET) on Thursday

Known as 2023 BU, the object is about half the size of the famous Chelyabinsk meteor (pictured) that hit Earth 2013. It will be at its closest point to Earth this Friday (January 27) at about 00:30 GMT (19:30 ET on Thursday)

Why has asteroid 2023 BU only just been seen?

Some asteroids can ‘sneak up’ on us thanks to a quirk of the Earth’s rotation that makes them seem like they are barely moving — making them hard to detect.

This is the warning of NASA-funded experts who investigated how telescopes nearly missed a 328-feet-wide asteroid that came within 43,500 miles of Earth back in 2019.

The space rock, dubbed ‘2019 OK’, was the first object of its size to get that close to our planet since 1908 — but it was only spotted 24 hours before its closest approach.

The reason, the team determined, is because it was moving toward us in such a way that its motion across the night sky was counteracted by the Earth’s spin.

Thus — to early warning systems like Pan-STARRS1 at Hawaii’s Haleakala Observatory — 2019 OK looked stationary, so did not set off the automated detection software.

In fact, the experts said, up to half of asteroids approaching Earth from a danger zone east of ‘opposition’ likely undergo periods of such apparent slow motion.

However, most scientists don’t consider this region to be a true part of the Earth’s atmosphere because the air is so thin.

Nevertheless, asteroid 2023 BU will pass well within the orbit of geostationary satellites above South America, but still far away from the International Space Station at 250 miles (400 km) from the Earth.

The space rock was discovered by astronomer Gennadiy Borisov at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyi, Crimea on Saturday.

He is famous for spotting the first comet ever seen that had traveled into the solar system from interstellar space, called 2I/Borisov.

2023 BU orbits the sun every 425 days, while its path occasionally intersects Earth’s orbital trajectory around our star.

It will next pass relatively close to us on December 6, 2036, but on that occasion will be well beyond the orbit of the moon.

NASA considers the asteroid a ‘near-Earth object’ (NEO) because its orbit sees it come within 120 million miles (195 million km) of the sun, but it is not a ‘potentially hazardous asteroid’ because it is not large enough to cause significant damage in the event of impact.

In February 2013, a meteor that blazed across the southern Urals and came down in Chelyabinsk, Russia was the largest recorded meteor strike in more than a century.

More than 1,600 people were injured by the shock wave from the explosion, estimated to be as strong as 20 Hiroshima atomic bombs, as it landed near the city.

The fireball, measuring 60ft (19 metres) across, screamed into Earth’s atmosphere at 41,600 mph and much of it landed in a local lake called Chebarkul.

Last year, experts warned that some asteroids can ‘sneak up’ on us thanks to a quirk of the Earth’s rotation that makes them seem like they are barely moving — making them hard to detect.

In fact, they said up to half of asteroids approaching Earth from a danger zone east of ‘opposition’ likely undergo periods of such apparent slow motion.

The NASA-funded experts investigated how telescopes nearly missed a 328-feet-wide asteroid that came within 43,500 miles of Earth back in 2019.

Astronomers are hunting for asteroids larger than 450ft as they can cause ‘catastrophic damage’

Researchers have discovered most of the asteroids that are about a kilometer in size, but are now on the hunt for those that are about 459ft (140m) – as they could cause catastrophic damage.

Although nobody knows when the next big impact will occur, scientists have found themselves under pressure to predict – and intercept – its arrival.

Artist’s impression painted

‘Sooner or later we will get… a minor or major impact,’ said Rolf Densing, who heads the European Space Operations Center (ESOC) in Darmstadt.

It may not happen in our lifetime, he said, but ‘the risk that Earth will get hit in a devastating event one day is very high.’

‘For now, there is little we can do.’

Source: AFP

Author: Nishikant

My name is Nishikant, I work as Sub Editor at newscinema.in

24 January, 2023, 7:21 pm

News Cinema on twitter News Cinema on facebook

Tuesday, 24th January 2023

Latest Web Stories

More Stories
Fifteen vital questions about the mother-of-two’s disappearance that are leaving the family baffled
Montana senator says there is ‘concern’ Chinese spy balloon infiltrated US to target missile fields
Hunter Biden accused of ‘intimidation’ after $75k defamation suit from Delaware laptop repairman
CA woman horrified after detectives called claiming they matched her 23andMe test to a 1986 murder
The north braces for ‘once in a generation’ wind chill as cold front from Canada blows in
MDMA and magic mushrooms approved for treatments
Miami mocked for unveiling African-themed police cruiser to celebrate Black History Month
Landlord found by tenant to be posing as handyman and entering home without notice
Bad posts, tough jobs and hostel shenanigans – Times Anubhav Singh Bhasi made us cry, laugh
Senate Judiciary Committee puts Ticketmaster on notice ahead of Beyoncé tour
Tesla electric car outsells Australia’s most popular SUVs
New York Blocks Payments to 20 Firms That Serve Hasidic Schools
The last dramatic episode of FC Barcelona is called Gavi
Three University of Idaho students claim they saw murders union suspect Bryan Kohberger at student
Madonna’s daughter Lourdes Leon DENIED entry to Marc Jacobs show after arriving after doors closed
Pamela Anderson defends unlikely friendship with Julian Assange and defends him as a ‘truth seeker’
How the multi-million dollar crime empire of feared Melbourne kingpin George Marrogi was smashed
ABC cops formal complaint over ‘white supremacy’ report on Alice Springs crime wave crisis meeting
Olivia Wilde looks somber while out in West Hollywood amid child support battle with Jason Sudeikis
Don Lemon ‘SCREAMED’ at CNN This Morning co-host after he accused her of ‘interrupting’ him
Man Paid $20,000 in Bitcoin in Failed Attempt to Have 14-Year-Old Killed, US Says
‘I asked her why…’: Aruna Irani shares Rekha’s ouster from ‘Mangalsutra’
Gauri Khan Faces Oops After Her Jacket Gets Stuck On A Pole Outside Designer Store – WATCH
She Took On Atlanta’s Gangs. Now she may be coming for Trump.
PIC: Boy, 5, who was brutally attacked by a mountain lion before his mom wrestled the animal off him
Siddharth Malhotra and Kiara Advani wedding: From the royal arena, Shahid Kapoor, Karan Johar star guest list dates, scoop
China Spying on America Using Balloon as Big as Three Buses? US Tracking Suspected Chinese Spy, Says Pentagon
Miami landlord is SLAMMED after filming himself telling tenant he’s more than doubling her rent
Qantas savaged after CEO Alan Joyce claims airline is ‘back to its best’
Actress And Hairdresser Took $3 Million From Malibu Doctor, Prosecutors Say
Report Traces Rising Prevalence of Semiautomatic Pistols in Gun Crimes
Unopened original iPhone set to ring up £41,000 at auction
Pentagon Discovers Suspected China Spy Balloon Over Northwest United States
Can a $1 TRILLION platinum coin solve the US debt crisis?
Who Do Bears Rub Against Trees? Scientists Offer New Explanation.
Lip reading analysis reveals Tom Brady raged about ‘sounding stupid’ during furious phone call
Biden Aims to Deter China With Greater US Military Presence in Philippines
Report finds 80 percent of butterflies have declined since the 1970s
Tech’s Biggest Companies Discover Austerity, to the Relief of Investors
MATT RIDLEY: Scientists will one day bring back dodos, great auks and even woolly mammoths
Arkansas Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders to deliver GOP State of the Union rebuttal
Furious legal row in Murdaugh trial over whether jury can hear about legal scion’s financial crimes